Neon Chameleon

Location: White Sands, NM / Settings: F9, ISO 50, 299 seconds

Blue hour is an incredible time for taking photos - the way the light transitions can yield interesting and unexpected results. It's the very tail end of a sunset - just before darkness.

I've composed a secret gallery with all my blue hour photos in one place so that you can see what those unexpected results might look like. Partially cloudy skies work best for a more dramatic sunset look.

So, what does it take to shoot something like this for yourself you ask? 

It takes being in the right location and waiting it out after the sun has set (bring a jacket!). After that, you have about a half hour to shoot while the light source is changing constantly, it's a tricky balance with a short window of opportunity. 

I recommend shooting at a high F-stop with low ISO for the beginning of blue hour, followed by incremental changes to your F-stop as the light transitions - a balance that you adjust as you go along.

Zion Zebra

Location: Zion National Park, UT / Settings: (Composite of 2 images) Light art at F5.6, ISO 50, 319 seconds. Landscape at F2.8, ISO 1600, 15 seconds.

This image was an idea I've been thinking about for some time. I keep trying to think of animals that I haven't done already - Zebra was a big one on that list, and how perfect - Zion.

I thought it would have to be in black and white, but after visiting the location, I decided to do the Zebra in color instead. The natural lines were too great not to have contrasted in black and white! Happy with how this came together using the Night-Writer V.2 prototype. 

I blended two images together to create this image - a black and white of the landscape (high ISO, low F stop setting) along with the colorful Zebra light-painting (low ISO, high F stop setting). I feel like this creates a more visible 'balance of detail' contained within the image. For more info on this technique, visit the EDU page - it's addressed in Question number 5 at the bottom of the page.

composite

Astro Bandit and I went on a little hike during the day, scope out this incredible layers of earth:

Saw some autumn color in the wash. A nice change from the usual foliage in Los Angeles.

Check out other Light-Animals along with Printing options in the Gallery below: 

Out for Blood

Location: Rainbow Basin - Barstow, CA / Settings: (Composite) Light art at F6.3, ISO 100, 163 seconds. Super Blood Moon at F6.3, ISO 3200, 6 seconds.

Gear: Canon 6DManfrotto Tripod24-70mm Lensremote shutter, and proto Night-Writer.

Last one from the Super Blood Moon - promise.

I just had to get in a light-skeleton on this momentous occasion. The next time a super blood moon comes around, I will be 50 years old.

If you do plan on shooting an event like this, here are a few tips I've learned from my own efforts:

1) Plan ahead - I wanted an interesting location, so I used Google's satellite-view map to find a cool layered geological locale a few hours out from Los Angeles.

2) Pack your bags - Make sure you have all the gear you need to make the shot happen - telephoto lens, remote shutter, tripod, LED lights, all that and a bag of chips or apples (if you get hungry). Water also - that's an important one in the desert!

3) Show up early - Getting there while it's still light out is crucial - Scout around the location and take pics on your phone for reference later when it's pitch-black out and you are scrambling to get the right angle.

Check out the full collection of Light-Skeletons below: