Rainbow Reindeer

Location: Redwoods National Park, CA | Settings: (composite) Light art at F5.6 / ISO 50 / 330 seconds. Environment at F3.5 / ISO 1600 / 46 seconds.

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Here's a luminous Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer in the Redwoods of Northern California - lighting the way.. Or is he lost again? Time will tell! 

Happy Holidays!

For the full collection of Light-Animals, check out the Gallery below:


Star-Stinger II

Location: Death Valley, CA / Settings: (Composite) Light art at F5.6, ISO 50, 278 seconds. Stars at F2.8, ISO 6400, 15 seconds

This is not the first time I've drawn a scorpion, and I'm sure it won't be the last - they are strange creatures and I like drawing them. 

I'd imagine this spectral version is a totally different species than the last one I drew in collaboration with Michael Shainblum back in December 2013 - he used a star-tracker to get an amazingly bright and clear image of the milky way for our collaborative piece.

For a look at more light-animals as well as the option to purchase prints, check out the Spirit Animal collection:


Neon Chameleon

Location: White Sands, NM / Settings: F9, ISO 50, 299 seconds

Blue hour is an incredible time for taking photos - the way the light transitions can yield interesting and unexpected results. It's the very tail end of a sunset - just before darkness.

I've composed a secret gallery with all my blue hour photos in one place so that you can see what those unexpected results might look like. Partially cloudy skies work best for a more dramatic sunset look.

So, what does it take to shoot something like this for yourself you ask? 

It takes being in the right location and waiting it out after the sun has set (bring a jacket!). After that, you have about a half hour to shoot while the light source is changing constantly, it's a tricky balance with a short window of opportunity. 

I recommend shooting at a high F-stop with low ISO for the beginning of blue hour, followed by incremental changes to your F-stop as the light transitions - a balance that you adjust as you go along.

Zion Zebra

Location: Zion National Park, UT / Settings: (Composite of 2 images) Light art at F5.6, ISO 50, 319 seconds. Landscape at F2.8, ISO 1600, 15 seconds.

This image was an idea I've been thinking about for some time. I keep trying to think of animals that I haven't done already - Zebra was a big one on that list, and how perfect - Zion.

I thought it would have to be in black and white, but after visiting the location, I decided to do the Zebra in color instead. The natural lines were too great not to have contrasted in black and white! Happy with how this came together using the Night-Writer V.2 prototype. 

I blended two images together to create this image - a black and white of the landscape (high ISO, low F stop setting) along with the colorful Zebra light-painting (low ISO, high F stop setting). I feel like this creates a more visible 'balance of detail' contained within the image. For more info on this technique, visit the EDU page - it's addressed in Question number 5 at the bottom of the page.

composite

Astro Bandit and I went on a little hike during the day, scope out this incredible layers of earth:

Saw some autumn color in the wash. A nice change from the usual foliage in Los Angeles.

Check out other Light-Animals along with Printing options in the Gallery below: 

Shocktopus

Location: Pfeiffer Beach - Big Sur, CA / Settings: F8, ISO 100, 564 seconds

Info on how this shot was created:

Gear: Canon 6D,  24-70mm LensManfrotto TripodRemote Shutter-release and prototype Night-Writer.

After the 6 hour drive, camp set-up, dinner and drinks, and campfire session til midnight, it was hard to find the motivation to go out on a cloudy night in the hopes of seeing stars on a new moon.

During the short hike to this pond in pitch dark, I surrendered to the now familiar tired and delirious state - the shot I had in mind was not possible, it depended on the weather, and the weather was crap!

I took one shot as a consolation attempt, I was in the right place, just not the right time. With all the effort it took to get there, why not finish strong before calling it a night? Sometimes, magic can be made in the most delirious state of mind. 

This is what all light-art photographers are out there shooting for - that one shot where you just know it all came together somehow, and now it's in the back of your camera in vivid detail. 

I shoot a lot of photos, and it's very rare to hit the KO punches - here's one :D