Pablo App

Locations: Los Angeles, CA | Berlin, Germany | Death Valley, CA

Here's an image I shot in Death Valley, CA at the Mesquite Dunes with a new long exposure video App called PABLO available for iPhone OS now via this LINK (Shot on iPhone 6 using a tripod).

The main point of this App is the process, it records the movement of your light live in-camera - pretty neat!

PABLO App is simple and user friendly - it works best w a tripod - tap the camera icon to get started and tap the red button to start recording. Tap the red button again and the video is over. Make sure to save & title your work, or delete if it's no good and share at your convenience!

I wasn't very good at the first few exposures with the App, one thing to note is you're definitely going to want a nice diffused light because it's easy to blow out such a tiny sensor with brighter torches (see below for example of blown out light). I did this skeleton in an abandoned hospital in Berlin - yes, it was creepy!

You can see how the App records casted light and directed light (video is sped up a bit).

Here's a quick one of the President Elect.. I used a Night-Writer w purple tip for this one but I think it was a bit too close for comfort so the light was a little bright in spots.

The last video I'll share is a quick one - a simple phrase that is all the rage right now. Now give this App a try tonight and see what you can come up with. 

Try some light-painting with your family over the holidays :)

How to Light-paint with an iPhone

Here's a how-to post for anyone that's not sure about buying an expensive DSLR camera, but still wants to experiment with light-painting and night-photography.

Don't believe you can shoot a decent light-painting image with a cellphone? Check out this gallery of images I've collected over the past few months - I'm pretty happy with them! Shot using an iPhone 6 and 6s Plus along with the Night-Writer & various Color-tips as the light-source:

To shoot these type of images you have to be totally dialed in! It takes a bit of practice, but once you get the hang of it - it's a great option to have on hand when you don't happen to have a DSLR handy!

Step One: Download the Right App

I used Night Cap Pro to shoot these images, but there are other good options like Slow-Shutter app.

Step Two: Dial it In

The right app settings are crucial to pulling this off! 

Here is a cheat-sheet for Light-painting with NightCap Pro:

1. Start off with selecting 'light trails' - tap the star icon on the right to toggle this option.

2. Just above the star is a lock button for once you get your settings down - don't do it yet, but just know it's there and that the green light should be on for at least 'FOC (focus)' and 'EXP (exposure)' options before you start your shot. 'WB (white balance)' is not something I used very often - I think it's set to 'auto' if you do nothing, which looks fine.

3. Adjust the exposure setting by sliding your thumb up on the right side of the viewer - I go with 1/2 - do this unless you want your light-lines to be dotted (no thanks!).

4. Set your ISO - I went with 50, but I've tried higher - 400 is ok, but it starts to get pretty noisy after 800.

5. Set your focus using the bottom slide-toggle - '0' is for super-macro stuff while I'd assume '100' would be for far away star-trails. I usually go with something from 69-75 - this is good for that 35mm look that most of us are familiar shooting with.

Step Three: Steady as She Goes

Please know that the camera has to be totally still while the long-exposure is happening! So use a tripod. If you don't have one handy - a coffee mug on a table will suffice (the dude abides): 

coffee mug tripod

Now that you've got your settings locked (Exp + Foc have green dots) you are ready to start your light-painting! Tap the large button to start (it turns red when on) and tap it again once you are finished with your light-art.

Step Four: iPhone Presets

Turn your Auto-Lock off. You don't want your camera shutting down during the middle of your light-painting, right?

Here's how you do it: Go to 'Settings', select 'General', select 'Auto-Lock' - switch to 'Never'.

Bonus Tip: Dim that light-source for best results!

My first results light-painting with the iphone were pretty dismal - I found out quickly that the bare Night-Writer light was too bright for the lens. I tried diffusing the LED with a crumpled-up receipt which resulted in more balanced exposures. Color-Tips worked great for diffusing the light also.  

The reason you need a fairly dim light-source is because your phone has a tiny lens, with a tiny sensor, and mostly automatic features - like what aperture to use when shooting in dark environments.

You're best option to get a well-balanced exposure is to control the brightness of your light-source. Bright light is great for casting toward environments, but not for using toward the lens (light-writing).

A good rule of thumb: If you can glance at the light without hurting your eyes, so can the camera.

Check out the video tutorial below:

More tips and tricks for light-art photography can be found in the EDU section.

 

Mortar-Pit Session

Location: San Pedro, CA / Settings: F.8, ISO 100, 714 seconds

Had a fun session with fellow night-shooter Brandon Yoshizawa the other day - the main challenge here was utilizing all the space!

I put on my skateboarder's thinking-cap and went to work here - a kick-flip here, push there, up the bank, then down the rail, power-slide to slow down a bit, then hit the ledge with a backside nose-blunt. I used a few color-tips on ye old Night-Writer for some variation between characters.

For the next shot (Troll Shower), Brandon took to the sky and delivered a nice steel wool spin from above - I placed a big blue troll below for good measure. On this one I used one of fellow light-artist Jason Page's light-painting brushes - a large bottle brush - FYI that Troll is around 8ft tall.

For the finisher, Brandon and I teamed up for this spectacle of a shot - he spun a fire-orb and I placed some skeletons around it. A nice bonus was to see the WAKE text up top.

City Stage (making of vid)

Location: Los Angeles, CA / Settings: F.22, ISO, 192 seconds

For a shot like this you have to control how much light enters your camera - for this reason, I set the lens to the highest aperture possible.

To get a good idea of how much my standing in front of the city-lights affected the exposure, just take a look at my legs - the city-lights are well exposed, outside of them I'd say it was a bit too bright for clarity's sake.

Fortunately, clarity of city-lights wasn't the point to this image, it's a balance of the elements - the tree, the angel, the lights below.

I hope you enjoy this photo, you can check out the full collection of Angels in my Gallery:

Light-paint a skeleton (step by step tutorial vid)

Location: Mt. Pinos - Frazier Park, CA

Here it is, a little how-to video on the subject of light-skeletons - I've been asked, and the idea of other people illustrating their very own skeletons with light makes me pretty damn amped!

Good luck out there with your creations! Please share them with me if you think you've got a good one - If you're on instagram, you can tag me @dariustwin - otherwise, email works ok too.

To learn more about light-art photography, you can visit my new EDU page devoted toward the education of light-art photography.